Prenatal Vitamins and Nausea

Filed Under Morning Sickness | 1 comment 
2012
Jul 11

Prenatal vitamins are an extremely important part of a pregnant woman’s diet. The fact of the matter is that most people just don’t get enough of certain vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients that they need on a daily basis. This is especially true for the pregnant woman, as she needs specific nutrients not only for her own health and well being, but to help her baby grow and develop as he or she should. Two of the most important ingredients in prenatal vitamins are Folic Acid and Iron. Folic Acid, a B vitamin, is known to reduce the chances that a baby will have a neural tube defect such as spina bifida. Iron is necessary because of the extra blood that a woman’s body must produce in order to carry precious nutrients to her baby. Without enough iron, a woman runs the risk of anemia, which is especially dangerous during pregnancy.

The problem with prenatal vitamins is that, very often, they will make a woman feel sick. There are a variety of possible explanations for this. Some prenatal vitamins have artificial colors or flavors that may irritate a woman’s stomach, and trigger morning sickness. For other women, the iron content may be higher than what they need, and also cause nausea. In other cases, it may be the format that the iron is delivered in that causes a problem.

The good news is that there are indeed prenatal vitamins that won’t make you feel sick. An example of these would be the Pregnancy Plus prenatal vitamin. This particular vitamin is formulated without those artificial colors or flavors, and delivers iron as iron fumarate, which may be different than how other prenatal vitamins deliver iron. These sorts of prenatal vitamins that won’t make you feel sick often come in a smaller pill form than traditional prenatal vitamins, as well.

While there is no guarantee that switching prenatal vitamins will keep you from feeling sick, many women have had success by doing so. As always, you should check with your health care provider before making the switch.